Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek history, Goddess Inspired jewelry Susanna Galanis, Susanna Galanis, Susanna Galanis Classical Education, Susanna Galanis History and Glamour, Susanna Galanis Inspired by History, Susanna Galanis Jewelry

Fortunate me

The Greek deity of fortune

The lucky person passes for a genius.
–Euripides (Ancient Greek Playwright)

God’s dice always have a lucky roll.
–Sophocles (Ancient Greek Playwright)

You gotta try your luck at least once a day because you could be going around lucky all day and not even know it.
–James Dean (American Actor & Cultural Icon)

Luck be a lady tonight
Luck be a lady tonight
Luck if youve been a lady to begin with
Luck be a lady tonight…
Little that he knew, Frank Sinatra, when he sang this song that Luck was not just a lady but the eternal and Divine  Goddess Tyche.
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Tyche represented in Greek Mythology something everybody has always been searching or wishing for: fortune. This is the Goddess that I wish to encounter more although, I am so grateful for her gifts already. After all,  if it was not for the divine Tyche’s graces, I wouldn’t have been able to design my jewelry so effortlessly and claim that “I am inspired by the Gods.” She is, and has always been  besides me, [well, most of the time]  ever since the day I was born back in my birthplace  Macedon, Northern Greece. Was she there specifically for me  on my birthday, or it was just my lucky day that she was around? I wonder. I tend to think that she made a very special trip just so I can receive all her blessings. Fortunate me. As it was, my grandfather Dimitrios and my grandmother Alexandra both gifted me with a gold coin as soon as I arrived for “Good Luck” thus, my love affair with ancient Greek coins began right there and then. Efharisto Thea Tyche (much gratitude), my beautiful Greek Goddess!

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As she is today, Goddess Tyche was the personification of Hope, Luck and Wealth. She was a labile, yet virtuous spirit, mediating between gods and mortals and leading human lives. She was therefore extraordinarily worshipped by the ancient Greeks.
The main symbol of goddess Tyche was a huge horn, inside of which she was keeping all wealth and richness; the horn once belonged to Amalthea, the goat who fostered Greek god Zeus during his infancy. Tyche was carrying the horn with her constantly, occasionally turning it upside down to spread all its goods to anyone who would meet her on his way.

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Tyche – A Deity in Greek Mythology In Greek, Tyche means “luck” and sometimes refers to the destiny and fate.

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Although not a goddess in Greek Mythology, Tyche was often seen as goddess and/or a patron-deity of luck, fortune, success, even prosperity in many cities of ancient Greece. Some gave her even power over chance and fate.

During the Hellenistic period, cities that had her as their patron, presented the specific icons of Tyche, on which she was wearing a mural crown.

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During the same period, Tyche appeared in many coins used by inhabitants in various cities and villages in the Aegean Sea.

Additional skills attributed to Tyche came probably from the other personification attached to her name. She also represented the “concept”. That’s how she became both an inspiration and intrigue for poets, writers, philosophers, all kind of artists in ancient Greece.

The two most famous works of art celebrating her power are: the statue ofAgathe Tyche by Praxiteles and Tyche of Antioch by Eutychides, which became the prototype for the images of the goddess.

Tyche simply became a symbol of fortune, luck, chance… The turns of fortune, that she carried, were often used in famous romances such as Clitophon and Leucippe or Daphnis and Chloe.

Empedocles On the Nature of Things, notes that “…all things are conceived in the will of Tyche”  thumb02020

Tyche described by Greek historians

Tyche lived through times and changes, always equally unpredicted and embraced or held responsible for several events and incidents. As the Greek historian Polybius wrote, whenever there was no tangible reason found for some disasters, like floods or frosts, Tyche was considered as a force behind them.

According to Hesiod’s Theogony, Tyche was one of the eldest of many Oceanides, daughters of Oceanus and Tethys. She had various attributes attached to her name. She was given the power of conducting the world’s affairs while holding a rudder.

With Ploutos she symbolized the plentiful gifts of fortune. And with a ball, Tyche was fully herself – nor steady nor capable of rolling in any direction, as the fortune is.

tyche-and-ploutosTyche and Ploutos

The Romans were inspired by the myths related to deity Tyche of the Greeks and created the Goddess Fortuna, who also represented luck, fortune and “concept” in life.

Be grateful for luck. Pay the thunder no mind – listen to the birds. And don’t hate nobody.

 Eubie Blake quotes 

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And now you know why, like all my beautiful and divine ancestors, I  worship with much gratitude the eternal Goddess of fortune Tyche. My two beautiful nephews George and Angelo have surprised me on my recent birthday (May 25th) with a statue of the Goddess which has been placed right front and center on my studio desk for continuous good luck and blessings. Lucky me ! Both George and Angelo are my good luck charms and I am so fortunate to have them 🙂
xoxoSusanna
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Father Zeus

KING OF THE GODS

“It is not possible either to trick or escape the mind of Zeus.”

Hesiod

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According to my divine ancestors, the ancient Greeks, Zeus was the “Father of Gods” who ruled the
Olympians of Mount Olympus. He was the god of sky and thunder.

As He still is today, ZEUS was the king of the gods, the god of sky and weather, law, order and fate. He was depicted as a regal man, mature with sturdy figure and dark beard. His usual attributes were a lightning bolt, royal sceptre and eagle.

Some of the more famous myths featuring the god include:

  • His birth and upbringing in the Diktaion cave, where he was nursed by Amaltheia and guarded by the shield-clashing Kouretes;
  • The Titan War in which he overthrew the Titanes and imprisoned them in Tartaros;
  • His battle with Typhoeus, a hundred headed, monstrous giant who attempted to capture heaven;
  • The War of the Giants who attempted to storm Olympos but were slain by Zeus and the gods;
  • The Great Deluge in which he flooded the earth to destroy mankind and begin the world anew;
  • His conflict with Prometheus over the theft of benefactions for mankind;
  • The punishment of Salmoneus, Tantalos and Ixion, men who offended the god with their impiety;
  • The birth and life of Herakles, his favoured son, who he had transferred to Olympos at death;
  • His extramarital affairs with women such as Leda, seduced in the form of a swan; Europa, as a bull; Danae, as a golden shower; Kallisto, as Artemis; and Antiope as a satyr;
  • The Trojan War which he orchestrated from start to end, including the casting of the golden apple of discord.

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Zeus was the child of Cronus and Rhea, and the youngest of their siblings. In most traditions he was married to
Hera, although, at the oracle of Dodona, his consort was Dione. According to the Iliad, he was the father of
Aphrodite by Dione. He was also known for his erotic escapades which resulted in many godly and heroic
offspring including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone (by Demeter), Dionysus, Perseus,
Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses (by Mnemosyne); by Hera, he was said to have
fathered Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus.
Even the gods who were not his natural children addressed him as Father Zeus. For the Greeks, he was the King
of the Gods, who ruled the universe. As Pausanias observed, “That Zeus is king in heaven.” In Hesiod’s
Theogony Zeus assigned the various gods their roles. In the Homeric Hymns he was referred to as the chieftain
of the gods. His symbols are the thunderbolt, eagle, bull, and oak. Zeus is frequently depicted by Greek
artists in one of two poses: standing, striding forward, with a thunderbolt leveled in his raised right hand, or
seated in majesty.

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BIRTH

Cronus, the Titan God, sired several children by Rhea: Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Poseidon, but
swallowed them all as soon as they were born, since he had learned from Gaia and Uranus that he was
destined to be overcome by his own son as he had overthrown his own father—an oracle that Rhea was to
hear and avert.
When Zeus was about to be born, Rhea sought Gaia to devise a plan to save him, so that Cronus would get
his retribution for his acts against Uranus and his own children. Rhea gave birth to Zeus in Crete, handing
Cronus a rock wrapped in swaddling clothes, which he promptly swallowed.

INFANCY

Rhea hid Zeus in a cave on Mount Ida in Crete. According to varying versions of the story:
-He was then raised by Gaia.
-He was raised by a nymph named Adamanthea. Since Cronus ruled over the Earth, the heavens and the
sea, she hid him by dangling him on a rope from a tree so he was suspended between earth, sea and sky
and thus, invisible to his father.
-He was raised by a nymph named Cynosura. In gratitude, Zeus placed her among the stars.
-He was raised by Melissa, who nursed him with goat’s milk
and honey.
-He was raised by a shepherd family under the promise that their sheep would be saved from wolves.

KING OF THE GODS

After reaching manhood, Zeus forced Cronus to disgorge first the stone (which was set down at Pytho under
the glens of Parnassus to be a sign to mortal men, the Omphalos) then his siblings in reverse order of swallowing. In some versions, Metis gave Cronus an emetic to force him to disgorge the babies, or Zeus cut Cronus’ stomach open. Then Zeus released the brothers of Cronus, the Gigantes, the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes, from their dungeon in Tartarus, killing their guard, Campe.

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As a token of their appreciation, the Cyclopes gave him thunder and the thunderbolt, or lightning, which had previously been hidden by Gaia. Together, Zeus and his brothers and sisters, along with the Gigantes, Hecatonchires and Cyclopes overthrew Cronus and the other Titans, in the combat called the Titanomachy. The defeated Titans were then cast into a shadowy underworld region known as Tartarus. Atlas, one of the titans that fought against Zeus, was punished by having to hold up the sky.

(Zeus in Titanomachy below)

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After the battle with the Titans, Zeus shared the world with his elder brothers, Poseidon and Hades, by drawing lots: Zeus got the sky and air, Poseidon the waters, and Hades the world of the dead (the underworld). The ancient Earth, Gaia, could not be claimed; she was left to all three, each according to their capabilities, which explains why Poseidon was the “earth-shaker” (the god of earthquakes) and Hades claimed the humans that died.

ZEUS AND HERA

Zeus was brother and consort of Hera. By Hera, Zeus sired Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus.  Some also include Eileithyia and Eris as their daughters. The conquests of Zeus among nymphs and the mythic mortal progenitors of Hellenic dynasties are famous. Olympian mythography even credits him with unions with Leto, Demeter, Dione and Maia. Among mortals were Semele, Io, Europa and Leda and with the young Ganymede. Many myths render Hera as jealous of his amorous conquests and a consistent enemy of Zeus’ mistresses and their children by him. For a time, a nymph named Echo had the job of distracting Hera from his affairs by talking incessantly,  and when Hera discovered the deception, she cursed Echo to repeat the words of others. According to legend, Metis, the goddess of prudence, was the first love of Zeus. At first she tried in vain to escape his advances, but in the end succumbed to his endeavor, and from their union Athena was conceived. Gaia warned Zeus that Metis would bear a daughter, whose son would overthrow him. On hearing this Zeus swallowed Metis, the reason for this was to continue to carry the child through to the birth himself. Hera was outraged and very jealous of her husband’s affair, also of his ability to give birth without female participation. To spite Zeus she gave birth to Hephaestus parthenogenetically  and it was Hephaestus who, when the time came, split open the head of Zeus, from which Athena emerged fully armed.

Zeus: Oh for shame, how the mortals put the blame on us gods, for they say evils come from us, but it is they, rather, who by their own recklessness win sorrow beyond what is given. 

And now you know the story of  the King of the Gods, according to the myths and the legends of my divine ancestors the ancient Greeks.

xoxoSusanna

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Pop Your Color

As much as I love a simple white tank paired with a chunky statement necklace I’ve really been drawn to bright colors and fun patterns as of lately. I browsed through some of my favorite boutiques this past weekend and couldn’t help but notice how my NYC ladies are mixing and matching contrasting colors creating creating eye catching ensembles. Even the ladies in the studio have been coming dressed to work in summer neons and brights making for a fun and festive work place! I have to say I am loving the look!

Naturally after beginning to embrace this colorful trend I couldn’t help but to think of one of my favorite artists, Andy Warhol. His works of art are nothing but genius and as all we all know, fashion and art are the greatest imitations of one another. One is always inspiring the other! You all know I love nothing more than an art inspired trend! Look below to see how I’m mixing and matching art and fashion to create an inspired look!

xoxo,

Susanna

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GIAMBATTISTA VALLI – Haute Couture Autumn 2013

GIANBATTISTA VALLI – Paris

 

This collection was dreamy…just dreamy! Made for modern-day fairy tales.

I can picture Cinderella going to the ball to meet prince charming wearing one of these magical creations…or Snow white or Venus…

Here are my favorite looks – which is almost the entire collection. 

Enjoy!

 

xoxo,

Susanna

 

Note: to see the entire collection please go to http://www.style.com/fashionshows/complete/slideshow/F2013CTR-VALLI/#40

 

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Lusting over Lichtenstein

Looking to the past for future inspirations is key for a creative mind. The eyes, mind and soul are constantly wandering and lusting for new creative direction and recently I have found myself in search for a boost of creative energy. My recent rediscovering of Roy Lichtenstein has me falling in love all over again with his use of color.  I happened to stumble upon Liechtenstein’s art over the weekend and haven’t been able to get his retro take on pop art out of my head. With this hot summer heat radiating down upon the city I have been gravitating more and more towards bold colors, especially summer yellow. My recent Lichtenstein obsession has me spinning with ideas for future collections as well as how I can incorporate this new creative boost into my current wardrobe.

Many of the interns are art majors or minors so we’ve been having an ongoing discussion all day debating our favorite Lichtenstein pieces as well as how this pop art genre has inspired so many amazing looks throughout history. From 60’s flower child, to color blocking, and today’s ever popular youthful festival wear, it seems that pop art inspired style is constantly being recycled throughout the generations. I love looking back at how trends from the past have influenced popular looks today! It’s always so fun to take a trip down memory lane isn’t it?

To make this look work for you throw on your favorite summer colors in the forms of geometric shapes or free spirited patterns. Layer your look with Susanna Galanis chains featuring charms and gems finally, finish your look off with a gorgeous gold cuff from my collection. There are so many ways to make this look work for you so have fun with it my fashionistas/os!

Stay inspired my darlings!

 

xoxo,

Susanna

To learn more about Roy Lichtenstein and his amazing work follow the follow the links below.

http://www.lichtensteinfoundation.org/

http://www.biography.com/people/roy-lichtenstein-9381678

To inquire about the jewelry featured in today’s blog post please look at my website http://www.susannagalanis.com/main_collection.asp or to set up a private viewing of the showroom please call 212.759.9142.

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Resort women’s collections 2014 – highlights

The Resort-2014 women’s designer collections are being presented currently in all the major fashion capitals of the world.

Like every season, I follow obsessively.

What are the fashions trends for Resort-2014? Classic,  feminine, timeless yet contemporary, easy, effortless, very elegant and  lady-like. I can really picture my current jewelry designs from the Daphne collection being a perfect styling match!

Here are my favorites:

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Downloads16Downloads17-001Downloads18Downloads19Downloads20Downloads21Downloads24Bottega Veneta R'14Downloads26Downloads27Downloads28Downloads29Downloads30

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Postcard – Classical ideal

 

 

CLASSICAL IDEAL- Ancient Athens, Classical Greece, Hellenistic Greece and  Ancient Rome

 

Classica Ideal - Classical and Hellenistic, and Roman worlds

Classical Ideal – Classical and Hellenistic, and Roman worlds

The Classical ideal of ancient Athens, pertains to the standard of excellence proposed by the cultures of ancient Greece, and Rome, beginning in the Golden Age of Greece. The ancient Greeks aspired to perfection in both body and mind, and sought a synthesis of the two poles of passion and reason. Through athletic behavior, they were able to exercise the value of perfection of body. Through philosophy, government, poetry, drama, law, logic, history, mathematics and architecture, they were able to express their desire for perfection of the mind. Through artistic portrayal of the human form they tried to achieve a synthesis of passion and reason.

The philosophy of Greek art of the Golden Age was that of moderation in all things, as represented by ‘The Winged Victory’. In sculpture, the characteristic form was

___________    SUSANNA GALANIS Jewelry Collection _______________________

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the male nude, which later inspired Michelangelo’s Statue of David of the Renaissance. During the peak of the Classical Greek civilization, the idealized figures of Greek art and architecture exemplified order and harmony. In architecture, the most famous building was the Parthenon. To the ancient Greeks, monuments were to be treated as large sculptures. They were thus built around the same rules of symmetry and ideal proportion. Public rites took place in front of a temple, where sculpture told the story of the temple’s deity. The religion of the Classical period of Greek and Roman history was polytheistic. The gods and mythical figures of the civilization were the subjects of homage in the arts, including drawing, sculpture, and architecture. The signature city of the Greek classical era was Athens. The main contributions of the Golden Age of ancient Athens were democracy, individualism and reason. The ideals and values were transmitted from Greece to Rome, and were later revived by many cultures of Europe.

The ideals of order and solemnity repeated themselves in the art and architecture of the ancient Romans, in the European Renaissance era and in the era of Neoclassicism in 17th and early 18th century Europe.

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