accessories, Apollo, Apollo and Daphne, Art, Beyonce, Coco Chanel, Couture, culture, Daphne Collection, Green, health, Health Wednesdays, Jewelry, Love, Men's Fasahion, New York City, Nike, salad, SummerStyle, Susanna Galanis, Susanna Galanis History & Glamour

Fresh to Daphne

With today’s weather being a fabulous mid 70 degrees everyone in the showroom has been craving a fresh salad from the nearby cafe. As lunch time came and passed it seemed intern after intern came back with a bowl of greens sprinkled with added pops of color in the form of fruit and veggies. Why not incorporate this healthy lifestyle choice into your everyday summer wardrobe? These gorgeous greens got us thinking how my newest Daphne collection adds pops of color to the most basic and fresh summer style. Why not change it up and wear a fantastic outfit of white and throw on a gorgeous green necklace to add some flavor to the mix? Stand out in the most simple of ways this week with a fresh twist on a summer trend. Continue below to see how were thinking fresh today in the showroom as well as one of my favorite salad recipe for a lovely summertime meal.

 

xoxo,

Susanna

White spinach salad with caramelized shallots: http://www.marthastewart.com/971965/spring-salad-recipes/@center/276955/seasonal-produce-recipe-guide#316919

For more information on how you can purchase the pieces shown in today’s blog as well as other pieces from my collections please visit my website http://www.susannagalanis.com/main_collection.asp or call 212.759.9142 to set up a meeting in the showroom.

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Ancient Greek history, Goddess Inspired jewelry Susanna Galanis, Jewelry, Nike, Uncategorized

Nike “winged goddess of victory”

 

 

NIKE –  the ancient Greek winged goddess of victory, triumph, strentgh and speed.

 

 

Nike was the winged goddess of victory, triumph, strength and speed according to the ancient Greek myths and legends.  She was depicted as the spirit or the goddess who personified victory, both in battle and peaceful competition.

According to the mythological stories, she was a very close companion of the king of gods: Zeus. When Zeus was gathering his allies at the start of the Titan War, against the older deities, he requested the infernal river Stynx, Nike’s mother, to bring all of her children for his support. Stynx, who was the daughter of Okeanos  and had four children with the giant Pallas: Nike (Victory), Zelos (Rivalry), Kratos (Strength), and Bia (Force) was summoned to bring her children to the service of the God. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer (a role which she is often portrayed in classical Greek art). All four children were appointed as sentinels standing beside the throne of the god.

One of the most famous artistic representations of the goddess Nike is the statute featured above called Nike of Samothrace.  It was discovered on the Greek Island of Samothrace in 1863 and is now housed in the famous Louvre Museum in Paris. This magnificent work of art was probably erected by the Rhodians about 203 BC to commemorate a sea battle.

Nike was depicted in Greek art having a variety of attributes including a wreath to crown the victors, an oinochoe and a phiale (bowl and a cup) for libations, a thymiaterion (incense burner), an altar and a lyre for celebration of victory in song. In scenes from Giantomachia (war of the Giants) she appeared driving the chariot of Zeus. In mosaic art and in coins Nike was often holding a palm branch as a symbol of victory. She was frequently portrayed  hovering with outspread wings over the victor in a competition; for her function referred to success not only in war but in athletics and all other undertakings. Indeed, Nike was eventually to be recognized as a sort of mediator between gods and men. One of her weakness was that she wanted to win at all costs.

Nike was closely identified with the goddess Athena, the goddess of wisdom, war strategy, peaceful negotiations and the divine patron of warriors.

There were several temples in the Ancient Greek world to honor the goddess such as the temple of Nike at Samothrace, at the Acropolis in  Athens and at Ephesus. Worship of the goddess Nike included processions, libations or sacrifices that were performed to elicit her favor. Petitions in a form of prayers could be presented to the priestesses officiating in the temples who could communicate these to the goddess at the sacret oracles. If the answer was received from the goddess it was presented to the petitioner by the priestess.

 

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SUSANNA GALANIS – Inspired by History Jewelry  Online                                                                             click right

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Will be back with more gods and goddesses soon…

                                                                            xoxoS

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