AGE OF GODS Athena Collection by Susanna Galanis, Alexander the Great Exhibit, Ancient Greek history, Classical Education, Goddess Inspired jewelry Susanna Galanis, Greek goddess Nike, Jewelry, Louvre Museum, Susanna Galanis Inspired by History

A Post Card – History & Glamour NIKE

 

 

A Post Card – History & Glamour NIKE!!!

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SUSANNA GALANIS Inspired by History                          Online Catalog

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NIKE – The eternal and universal winged goddess of VICTORY! 

In antiquity, the Greek goddess Nike was represented in statues and paintings as a woman with wings, dressed in a billowing robe, and carrying a wreath which was intended to be awarded to the “winner.” Please visit the Louvre Museum in Paris for more details as one of the most famous statues in the world “Nike of Samothrace” is permanently exhibited there in the most magnificent manner – Nike prefers the splendor of Paris! The French, I must say,  are the most gracious hosts! Currently, they are hosting the “In the Kingdom of Alexander the Great – Ancient Macedonia” exibit and I am for ever greatful … as a proud Macedonian myself…

Since I am mentioning Alexander, in this post about Nike and “winners,” there is a very famous quote that I must share with you:                                                                  

                        “To the winner.” This is what Alexander the Great – King of Macedon famously replied when, at his death bed was asked, “To whom was he bequeathing the Macedonian Kingdom?”

Please see my previous posts in this blog for earlier writings, as my fascination with Nike does not seem to go away.

Nike’s message is very simple : She does NOT like loosing. 

She stayed on Mount Olympus, a place in Greek mythology to be between the earth and the heavens, along with Zeus, Athena, Hera, Hades [well, Hades was not staying there as he was the God of the underworld], Poseidon, Ares, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Aphrodite, Demeter and Hestia, back in the AGE OF GODS… Can you imagine the scene? 

The Olympian Gods loved Nike, so did everyone else at the time [and ever since…] There was nothing sweeter for the Ancient Greeks than to taste the sweet fruits of NIKE [Victory], be it in war, in love or in athletics. This is a passion which survives to this day, and the thrill of Victory is one of the best feelings in the world – as a modern Greek, I can attest to that!  You can see why I am obsessing with Nike!

As per goddess Nike [my strongest belief as well] loosing is NOT an option!

Here are two postcards for inspiration:

My new collection of Goddess Inspired Jewelry which I am naming AGE OF GODS – Athina will be available soon. needless to say, a collection inspired by goddess Nike is in the works as well….I will be updating you…

xoxoS

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Ancient Greek history, Goddess Inspired jewelry Susanna Galanis, Jewelry, Nike, Uncategorized

Nike “winged goddess of victory”

 

 

NIKE –  the ancient Greek winged goddess of victory, triumph, strentgh and speed.

 

 

Nike was the winged goddess of victory, triumph, strength and speed according to the ancient Greek myths and legends.  She was depicted as the spirit or the goddess who personified victory, both in battle and peaceful competition.

According to the mythological stories, she was a very close companion of the king of gods: Zeus. When Zeus was gathering his allies at the start of the Titan War, against the older deities, he requested the infernal river Stynx, Nike’s mother, to bring all of her children for his support. Stynx, who was the daughter of Okeanos  and had four children with the giant Pallas: Nike (Victory), Zelos (Rivalry), Kratos (Strength), and Bia (Force) was summoned to bring her children to the service of the God. Nike assumed the role of the divine charioteer (a role which she is often portrayed in classical Greek art). All four children were appointed as sentinels standing beside the throne of the god.

One of the most famous artistic representations of the goddess Nike is the statute featured above called Nike of Samothrace.  It was discovered on the Greek Island of Samothrace in 1863 and is now housed in the famous Louvre Museum in Paris. This magnificent work of art was probably erected by the Rhodians about 203 BC to commemorate a sea battle.

Nike was depicted in Greek art having a variety of attributes including a wreath to crown the victors, an oinochoe and a phiale (bowl and a cup) for libations, a thymiaterion (incense burner), an altar and a lyre for celebration of victory in song. In scenes from Giantomachia (war of the Giants) she appeared driving the chariot of Zeus. In mosaic art and in coins Nike was often holding a palm branch as a symbol of victory. She was frequently portrayed  hovering with outspread wings over the victor in a competition; for her function referred to success not only in war but in athletics and all other undertakings. Indeed, Nike was eventually to be recognized as a sort of mediator between gods and men. One of her weakness was that she wanted to win at all costs.

Nike was closely identified with the goddess Athena, the goddess of wisdom, war strategy, peaceful negotiations and the divine patron of warriors.

There were several temples in the Ancient Greek world to honor the goddess such as the temple of Nike at Samothrace, at the Acropolis in  Athens and at Ephesus. Worship of the goddess Nike included processions, libations or sacrifices that were performed to elicit her favor. Petitions in a form of prayers could be presented to the priestesses officiating in the temples who could communicate these to the goddess at the sacret oracles. If the answer was received from the goddess it was presented to the petitioner by the priestess.

 

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SUSANNA GALANIS – Inspired by History Jewelry  Online                                                                             click right

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Will be back with more gods and goddesses soon…

                                                                            xoxoS

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