Ancient Greece, Ancient Greek history, Goddess Inspired jewelry Susanna Galanis, Susanna Galanis, Susanna Galanis Classical Education, Susanna Galanis History and Glamour, Susanna Galanis Inspired by History, Susanna Galanis Jewelry

Fortunate me

The Greek deity of fortune

The lucky person passes for a genius.
–Euripides (Ancient Greek Playwright)

God’s dice always have a lucky roll.
–Sophocles (Ancient Greek Playwright)

You gotta try your luck at least once a day because you could be going around lucky all day and not even know it.
–James Dean (American Actor & Cultural Icon)

Luck be a lady tonight
Luck be a lady tonight
Luck if youve been a lady to begin with
Luck be a lady tonight…
Little that he knew, Frank Sinatra, when he sang this song that Luck was not just a lady but the eternal and Divine  Goddess Tyche.
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Tyche represented in Greek Mythology something everybody has always been searching or wishing for: fortune. This is the Goddess that I wish to encounter more although, I am so grateful for her gifts already. After all,  if it was not for the divine Tyche’s graces, I wouldn’t have been able to design my jewelry so effortlessly and claim that “I am inspired by the Gods.” She is, and has always been  besides me, [well, most of the time]  ever since the day I was born back in my birthplace  Macedon, Northern Greece. Was she there specifically for me  on my birthday, or it was just my lucky day that she was around? I wonder. I tend to think that she made a very special trip just so I can receive all her blessings. Fortunate me. As it was, my grandfather Dimitrios and my grandmother Alexandra both gifted me with a gold coin as soon as I arrived for “Good Luck” thus, my love affair with ancient Greek coins began right there and then. Efharisto Thea Tyche (much gratitude), my beautiful Greek Goddess!

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As she is today, Goddess Tyche was the personification of Hope, Luck and Wealth. She was a labile, yet virtuous spirit, mediating between gods and mortals and leading human lives. She was therefore extraordinarily worshipped by the ancient Greeks.
The main symbol of goddess Tyche was a huge horn, inside of which she was keeping all wealth and richness; the horn once belonged to Amalthea, the goat who fostered Greek god Zeus during his infancy. Tyche was carrying the horn with her constantly, occasionally turning it upside down to spread all its goods to anyone who would meet her on his way.

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Tyche – A Deity in Greek Mythology In Greek, Tyche means “luck” and sometimes refers to the destiny and fate.

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Although not a goddess in Greek Mythology, Tyche was often seen as goddess and/or a patron-deity of luck, fortune, success, even prosperity in many cities of ancient Greece. Some gave her even power over chance and fate.

During the Hellenistic period, cities that had her as their patron, presented the specific icons of Tyche, on which she was wearing a mural crown.

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During the same period, Tyche appeared in many coins used by inhabitants in various cities and villages in the Aegean Sea.

Additional skills attributed to Tyche came probably from the other personification attached to her name. She also represented the “concept”. That’s how she became both an inspiration and intrigue for poets, writers, philosophers, all kind of artists in ancient Greece.

The two most famous works of art celebrating her power are: the statue ofAgathe Tyche by Praxiteles and Tyche of Antioch by Eutychides, which became the prototype for the images of the goddess.

Tyche simply became a symbol of fortune, luck, chance… The turns of fortune, that she carried, were often used in famous romances such as Clitophon and Leucippe or Daphnis and Chloe.

Empedocles On the Nature of Things, notes that “…all things are conceived in the will of Tyche”  thumb02020

Tyche described by Greek historians

Tyche lived through times and changes, always equally unpredicted and embraced or held responsible for several events and incidents. As the Greek historian Polybius wrote, whenever there was no tangible reason found for some disasters, like floods or frosts, Tyche was considered as a force behind them.

According to Hesiod’s Theogony, Tyche was one of the eldest of many Oceanides, daughters of Oceanus and Tethys. She had various attributes attached to her name. She was given the power of conducting the world’s affairs while holding a rudder.

With Ploutos she symbolized the plentiful gifts of fortune. And with a ball, Tyche was fully herself – nor steady nor capable of rolling in any direction, as the fortune is.

tyche-and-ploutosTyche and Ploutos

The Romans were inspired by the myths related to deity Tyche of the Greeks and created the Goddess Fortuna, who also represented luck, fortune and “concept” in life.

Be grateful for luck. Pay the thunder no mind – listen to the birds. And don’t hate nobody.

 Eubie Blake quotes 

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And now you know why, like all my beautiful and divine ancestors, I  worship with much gratitude the eternal Goddess of fortune Tyche. My two beautiful nephews George and Angelo have surprised me on my recent birthday (May 25th) with a statue of the Goddess which has been placed right front and center on my studio desk for continuous good luck and blessings. Lucky me ! Both George and Angelo are my good luck charms and I am so fortunate to have them 🙂
xoxoSusanna
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Lusting over Lichtenstein

Looking to the past for future inspirations is key for a creative mind. The eyes, mind and soul are constantly wandering and lusting for new creative direction and recently I have found myself in search for a boost of creative energy. My recent rediscovering of Roy Lichtenstein has me falling in love all over again with his use of color.  I happened to stumble upon Liechtenstein’s art over the weekend and haven’t been able to get his retro take on pop art out of my head. With this hot summer heat radiating down upon the city I have been gravitating more and more towards bold colors, especially summer yellow. My recent Lichtenstein obsession has me spinning with ideas for future collections as well as how I can incorporate this new creative boost into my current wardrobe.

Many of the interns are art majors or minors so we’ve been having an ongoing discussion all day debating our favorite Lichtenstein pieces as well as how this pop art genre has inspired so many amazing looks throughout history. From 60’s flower child, to color blocking, and today’s ever popular youthful festival wear, it seems that pop art inspired style is constantly being recycled throughout the generations. I love looking back at how trends from the past have influenced popular looks today! It’s always so fun to take a trip down memory lane isn’t it?

To make this look work for you throw on your favorite summer colors in the forms of geometric shapes or free spirited patterns. Layer your look with Susanna Galanis chains featuring charms and gems finally, finish your look off with a gorgeous gold cuff from my collection. There are so many ways to make this look work for you so have fun with it my fashionistas/os!

Stay inspired my darlings!

 

xoxo,

Susanna

To learn more about Roy Lichtenstein and his amazing work follow the follow the links below.

http://www.lichtensteinfoundation.org/

http://www.biography.com/people/roy-lichtenstein-9381678

To inquire about the jewelry featured in today’s blog post please look at my website http://www.susannagalanis.com/main_collection.asp or to set up a private viewing of the showroom please call 212.759.9142.

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God Hermes

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Hermes, the herald of the Olympian gods, is the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia, daughter of Atlas and one of the Pleiades. Hermes is the god of shepherds, land travel, merchants, weights and measures, oratory, literature, athletics and thieves, and known for his cunning and shrewdness. Most importantly, he is the messenger of the gods. Besides that he was also a minor patron of poetry. He was worshiped throughout Greece — especially in Arcadia — and festivals in his honor were called Hermoea.

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According to legend, Hermes was born in a cave on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia. Zeus had impregnated Maia at the dead of night while all other gods slept. When dawn broke amazingly he was born. Maia wrapped him in swaddling bands, then resting herself, fell fast asleep. Hermes, however, squirmed free and ran off to Thessaly. This is whereApollo, his brother, grazed his cattle. Hermes stole a number of the herd and drove them back to Greece. He hid them in a small grotto near to the city of Pylos and covered their tracks. Before returning to the cave he caught a tortoise, killed it and removed its entrails. Using the intestines from a cow stolen from Apollo and the hollow tortoise shell, he made the first lyre. When he reached the cave he wrapped himself back into the swaddling bands.

When Apollo realized he had been

2hermescondionisosdepraxc3adtelesrobbed he protested to Maia that it had been Hermes who had taken his cattle. Maia looked to Hermes and said it could not be, as he is still wrapped in swaddling bands. Zeus the all powerful intervened saying he had been watching and Hermes should return the cattle to Apollo. As the argument went on, Hermes began to play his lyre. The sweet music enchanted Apollo, and he offered Hermes to keep the cattle in exchange for the lyre. Apollo later became the grand master of the instrument, and it also became one of his symbols. Later while Hermes watched over his herd he invented the pipes known as a syrinx (pan-pipes), which he made from reeds. Hermes was also credited with inventing the flute. Apollo, also desired this instrument, so Hermes bartered with Apollo and received his golden wand which Hermes later used as his heralds staff. (In other versions Zeus gave Hermes his heralds staff).

Being the herald (messenger of the gods), it was his duty to guide the souls of the dead down to the underworld, which is known as a psychopomp. He was also closely connected with bringing dreams to mortals. Hermes is usually depicted with a broad-brimmed hat or a winged cap, winged sandals and the heralds staff (kerykeion in Greek, or Caduceus in Latin). It was often shown as a shaft with two white ribbons, although later they were represented by serpents intertwined in a figure of eight shape, and the shaft often had wings attached. The clothes he donned were usually that of a traveler, or that of a workman or shepherd. Other symbols of Hermes are the cock, tortoise and purse or pouch.

Originally Hermes was a phallic god, being attached to fertility and good fortune, and also a patron of roads and boundaries. His name coming from herma, the plural being hermaiherm was a square or rectangular pillar in either stone or bronze, with the head of Hermes (usually with a beard), which adorned the top of the pillar, and male genitals near to the base of the pillar. These were used for road and boundary markers. Also in Athens they stood outside houses to help fend off evil. In Athens of 415 BCE, shortly before the Athenian fleet set sail against Syracuse (during the Peloponnesian War), all the herms throughout Athens were defaced. This was attributed to people who were against the war. Their intentions were to cast bad omens on the expedition, by seeking to offend the god of travel. (This has never been proved as the true reason for the mutilation of the herms.)

345px-Hermes_Logios_Altemps_33The offspring of Hermes are believed to be PanAbderus and Hermaphroditus. Hermes as with the other gods had numerous affairs with goddesses, nymphs and mortals. In some legends even sheep and goats. Pan, the half man half goat, is believed to be the son of Hermes and Dryope, the daughter of king Dryops. Pan terrified his mother when he was born, so much so that she fled in horror at the sight of her new born son. Hermes took Pan to Mount Olympus were the gods reveled in his laughter and his appearance and became the patron of fields, woods, shepherds and flocks. Abderus, a companion of the hero Heracles, is also thought to be a son of Hermes, he was devoured by the Mares of Diomedes, after Heracles had left him in charge of the ferocious beasts. Hermaphroditus (also known as Aphroditus) was conceived after the union of Hermes and Aphrodite. He was born on Mount Ida but he was raised by the Naiads (nymphs of freshwater). He was a androgynous (having the characteristics of both sexes) deity, depicted as either a handsome young man but with female breasts, or as Aphrodite with male genitals.

Known for his swiftness and athleticism, Hermes was given credit for inventing foot-racing and boxing. At Olympia a statue of him stood at the entrance to the stadium and his statues where in every gymnasium throughout Greece. Apart from herms, Hermes was a popular subject for artists. Both painted pottery and statuary show him in various forms, but the most fashionable depicted him as a good-looking young man, with an athletic body, and winged sandals and his heralds staff.

More facts about Hermes (well facts according to the myths and the legends, but I believe them – I believe everything the ancient Greeks believed):

See below the recent birthday (May 25th)  gift I received from my two beautiful nephews George and Angelo. Thank you kids! I love you!

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Family of Hermes

Parents: Hermes was the son of Zeus, the King of the Gods, and the mountain Nymph Maea, who was a daughter of the Titan Atlas. Hermes was born inside a cave on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia, southern Greece.
Famous ChildrenHermaphroditus and the Satyr Pan.

Hermes, the God’s Messenger and Conductor of Souls

Hermes was wearing wings on his sandals and therefore was the speediest of all Greek gods. Because of his speed, Hermes received the role of the messenger and conductor of souls to the Underworld. Hermes was the only Olympian god who was authorized to visit Heaven, Earth and also the Underworld and enjoyed this way popularity among all the Greek gods and spirits.article-new_ehow_images_a07_b9_dh_make-hermes-costume-800x800

Hermes, the God of the Thieves

It is well known that Ancient Greeks endowed their gods with human weaknesses. Hermes, for instance, felt an irresistible impulse of stealing ever since his infancy and quickly developed as the god of the cheaters and the thieves.

Hermes’ special Relation to Zeus

Hermes was a messenger of all gods, but mostly he was known for performing duties for his father Zeus with great pleasure. Zeus appreciated Hermes’ wits highly and always asked for Hermes’ assistance throughout his decisions, especially when it came to cheating on his wife Hera.

Appearance of Hermes

Hermes was a young man, wearing traveling clothes, a flat hat known as “petasus” and winged sandals on his feet. Oftentimes he was also considered to have wings attached to his shoulders and hat.
Hermes usually held a winged staff with snakes wrapped around it in his hands in order to gain access everywhere. This staff helped Hermes to charm the gods or to wake up those who were tamed by the god of sleep.

Symbols of Hermes

The caduceus (his staff), the purse (or leather pouch), the winged sandals, the ram and the petasus (his hat).

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POSTCARD Queen Olympias – The mother

New post coming up.

Queen Olympias of Macedon. The famous mother and queen that gave us the gift of Alexander the Great. She is fascinating!

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POSTCARD Major confrontation

 

 

Archangel Micheal 

 

In the New Testament ( Book of Revelations) archangel Michael leads God’s armies against Satan’s  forces, where in the war in heavens he defeats Satan. He is often depicted slaying a demon with his mighty sword. His chief function is ridding the world of fear and toxic energies.


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Call upon this archangel as a strong protector and a support system.

                                                   

Below:  Guido Reni’s Michael (in Santa Maria della Concezione church, Rome 1636) tramples Satan.

Archangel Michael is seen as a healer angel, as a protector and the leader of the army of God against the forces of evil. The Book of Revelations (12:7-9) describes a war in heaven in which Michael, being stronger, defeats Satan.

“…there was a war in heaven, Michael and his angels fought against the dragon, and the dragon and his angels fought back. But, he was not strong enough, and they lost their place in heaven…”

After the conflict, Satan is thrown to earth along with the fallen angels where he (“…that ancient serpent called the devil, still tries to lead the world astray…”)

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Euripides – The drama king

 

 

Euripides 484-406 BC

One of the three great tragedians of classical Athens.

 

 

Famous quotes:

 

– Short is the joy that guilty pleasure brings.

– Do not consider painful what is good for you.

– Waste no fresh tears over old griefs.

– Your very silence shows you agree.

– A bad beginning makes a bad ending.

– Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish.

 

…more to come soon….xoxoS

 

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Greek god Apollo

 

 

APOLLO

“Nothing in excess” Apollo

 


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APOLLO, one of the twelve deities of Olympus is the favorite son of god Zeus and Leto  – a Titan goddess who was impregnated by Zeus during one of his numerous love affairs. He is the twin brother of goddess Artemis.

He is known as the God of Light or the God of Sun- Helios, The Archer, the God of Prophecy, the Far-shooter, the Lawgiver or the God of Order, the God of Healing, the God of Music, the God of Plague, the Gold-bladed Apollo and the God of Arts and Muses.

His main iconic identifiers are the laurel wreath around his head, the lyre, the bow, the sun and the chariot (which as the sun god, drives across the sky daily-according to the myths). God Apollo is usually described  as the “most Greek” of the Greek Gods because he is THE idealized form of KOUROS, a young man in perfected beauty and grace.

EARLY YEARS

His story begins with his mother Leto and her attempt to give birth to him and Artemis. Hera ( the official wife of God Zeus), in her jealousy had pursued Leto relentlessly. Leto searched for a place where she could give birth to the children without Hera finding her. She convinced the island of Delos to be the home of Apollo, saying that a temple would be build there. Leto waited nine days and nights to give birth to Apollo, because due to Hera’s rage, Eilithyia, the goddess of childbirth, was not able to come to Leto’s aid. Finally Iris, the messenger goddess, was send to Hera, offering her a necklace fifteen feet long. Well, jewelrey always works (even back in the Ancient world of Greece ), Eilithya was able to come to Delos, and when she did, Leto gave birth to Apollo – full grown. Apollo immediately claimed, “The lyre and the curved bow are dear to me, and I shall prophesy to men the unerring will of Zeus” (according to Homeric Hymn to Apollo.

At the tender age of four days old, Apollo showed incredible talent in archery by killing the gigantic serpent named Python (at the city of Delphi) who had been harassing his mother during pregnancy (again, according to the myths and the legends.) When Goddess Hera found our that Zeus had had another affair, she send Python to follow Leto day and night so she could not have any peace to have her children.  The monstrous Python who was said to measure several acres in length was terrorizing the city and the citizens of Delphi were glad to be rid of of her and were grateful to Apollo – later Delphi was established as the center of Apollo’s worship.

Image above, Temple of Apollo at Delphi 

Delphi was the first oracle of Greece and the district where it was located was considered the navel of the world at the time.

“Know thyself.” Apollo (written at the entrance at the Temple of Apollo at Delphi).

Following his dramatic debut with the Python, Apollo went on to become not only an unerring archer, but the best musician, poet, philosopher, law-maker and creator of legal institutions, a masterful physician, the god of prophecy and a great scholar who always spoke the truth.

More about Apollo coming soon…there is so much more to tell…

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